Tag Archives: Peter

Between the Lines: Easter 4: April 21, 2013

Text: Acts 9:36-43

Charity

Charity (Photo credit: Danny McL)

Now in Joppa there was a disciple whose name was Tabitha, which in Greek is Dorcas. She was devoted to good works and acts of charity… [When Peter arrived] All the widows stood beside him, weeping and showing tunics and other clothing that Dorcas had made while she was with them.

Luke Timothy Johnson argues that “Luke uses a character’s disposition of possessions as a character indicator.” What might Luke have to say about our modern era of a widening gap between the wealthy and the poor and conspicuous consumption? What might your own use of your possessions say about you? Where are your priorities, according to how you spend your money, your time, your resources? Whom or what do you serve?

– Andy Kille


“Between the Lines” is excerpted from BibleWorkbench, a weekly resource for engaging the biblical story in a new way published by the Educational Center in Charlotte, NC.  For details and subscription information, see About BibleWorkbench.

TeenText: Transfiguration

This week’s TeenText, the companion resource for young people that uses the same approach and follows the same texts as BibleWorkbench, offers this thought on the story of the transfiguration in Luke’s gospel (Luke 9: 28-36):

In the movie Lord of The Rings, the wizard, Gandalf the Grey, returns as Gandalf the White. His friends are amazed at his return but they do not question his transformation. In what ways do the images from the video remind you of the biblical story about Jesus?


TeenText, a weekly resource for engaging the biblical story in a new way for teens in grades 6-8 and 9-12, is published by the Educational Center in Charlotte, NC.  For details and subscription information, see the Educational Center website.

Between the Lines: Transfiguration Sunday: February 10, 2013

Text: Luke 9:28-36, (37-43a)

clouds

a cloud overshadowed them
(Photo: Shandi-lee)

While he was saying this, a cloud came and overshadowed them; and they were terrified as they entered the cloud. Then from the cloud came a voice that said, “This is my Son, my Chosen; listen to him!”

Not knowing what he has said or is saying, Peter suggests making three booths for Jesus, Moses and Elijah, creating a new trinity of holy ones. While he is saying this there is the cloud and shadows, terror and the voice. Only now does Peter realize that he has missed the point, misunderstood what he has seen. What have you known of revelatory moments in your life when you got the message wrong? How have you been brought up short only when a dark cloud has subsequently overshadowed and terrified you? What was the event you misinterpreted? What was the cloud and shadow? What do you recall of the terror? Why might it be that in some of life’s most important events we assume too easily and speak too quickly? Why might it be that it takes dark clouds and terror to make us reconsider and recalibrate? If there are dark clouds in your life and, perhaps, some fears that haunt you, wonder if they too may be challenging you to rethink some of the conclusions you are making about someone who is important to you. Even conclusions about yourself!

– Bill Dols


“Between the Lines” is excerpted from BibleWorkbench, a weekly resource for engaging the biblical story in a new way published by the Educational Center in Charlotte, NC.  For details and subscription information, see About BibleWorkbench.

Between the Lines: Easter 6: May 13, 2012

HOLY SPIRIT - FOIX

HOLY SPIRIT – FOIX (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Text: Acts 10:44-48

Then Peter said, ‘Can anyone withhold the water for baptizing these people who have received the Holy Spirit just as we have?’

What do you make of Peter’s testimony that these outsiders have already been empowered by God’s Holy Spirit without ever having been baptized? What is Peter suggesting about the power and nature of the Holy Spirit? How might one like a Gentile (non-believer or non-member) meet or be filled with the Holy Spirit? What is being suggested here about baptism? What do you suppose Peter might tell you is the purpose of baptism? What do you know of rules and regulations – traditions and historical conventions – that make this division by denying unbaptized people access to community or liturgy, receiving bread and wine at the Eucharist, even ordination? What do you know of unbaptized people you have known who extol and pray to God as well as speak in a holy tongue? What is the cost and promise of high walls and deep divisions along baptismal lines? What might be the cost and promise of crossing over them, welcoming, even being touched by Godly unbaptized hand?

– Bill Dols


“Between the Lines” is excerpted from BibleWorkbench, a weekly resource for engaging the biblical story in a new way published by the Educational Center in Charlotte, NC. BibleWorkbench includes a series of open-ended questions focused on a reading in the Common Lectionary aimed at drawing readers into the story and making connections with the world around them and the world within. Also included are “Between the Lines” reflections, Parallel Readings from literature, poetry, and the news, and Critical Background on the text and its setting. For details and subscription information, go to www.educationalcenter.org.

Between the Lines: Transfiguration: February 19, 2012

Text: Mark 9:2-9

Rabbi, it is good for us to be here; let us make three dwellings, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah.

English: Two women winnowing grain, Caucasus, ...

Image via Wikipedia

The dwellings that Peter speaks of might be like the sukkah, the temporary shelter that plays a central role in the Jewish celebration of Sukkoth, the Festival of Booths. The sukkah is patterned on the temporary shelters that workers would erect in the fields during the harvest. Fields were outside the city, and it took a long time to travel from home, so to save time, the workers would “camp out” for the duration. Sukkoth is a harvest festival, but it is also a time to remember the wanderings in the wilderness—the 40-year period following the Exodus from Egypt.

What might Peter desire to stay near in building dwellings? What might he wish to do in the dwellings? Why might he think it is good to do so?

– Andy Kille